biographical data

Gordon Ernst biography: 13 things about ex-Georgetown University tennis coach from Cranston, Rhode Island

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Gordon Ernst is a white man who has lived in different parts of the United States including Rhode Island, Maryland and Massachusetts. His nickname is Gordie.

Ernst’s father Dick Ernst coached high school hockey and tennis in Rhode Island for decades. Here are 13 more things about Gordie:

  1. He is a native of Cranston, Providence County, Rhode Island. (a)
  2. He has homes in Chevy Chase, Maryland and in Falmouth, Massachusetts. (a)
  3. He is married to Lisa Ernst. (b)
  4. When he was in high school, he led Rhode Island in tennis and hockey. He was dubbed the golden boy of Rhode Island high school sports in the 1980s. (a)
  5. After graduating from Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, he played tennis professionally then launched his university coaching career at Northwestern in 1997. (a)
  6. In 2006, Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., USA hired him as a tennis coach. (a)
  7. Between 2007 and 2018, California college admissions consultant Rick Singer paid him some $2.7 million in bribes under the guise of consulting fees. Singer was accused of leading a bribery scheme by helping rich families cheat on standardized tests and paying off coaches and administrators by funneling the money through a fake charitable foundation. During this period, parents would mail checks to him directly for false claims about their children’s tennis prowess to gain admission to Georgetown University as tennis recruits. In exchange for the bribes, he successfully designated at least 12 of Singer’s clients as tennis recruits including students who did not even play tennis. (a)(b)
  8. In December 2017, Georgetown University placed him on leave after discovering irregularities in the athletic and other credentials of two separate students being recruited by him to play tennis. After investigating, the university found that he had violated university rules concerning admission. (a)
  9. In February 2018, Georgetown University asked him to resign effective June 30, 2018. In August 2018, the University of Rhode Island in South Kingstown, Rhode Island hired him as head women’s tennis coach. He resigned the post before his arraignment in 2019. (a)
  10. On March 12, 2019, he was arrested and charged with racketeering conspiracy. That day, he made an appearance in U.S. District Court in Maryland and was released on $200,000 bond. (b)
  11. On October 22, 2019, he pleaded not guilty to conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud and honest services mail and wire fraud; conspiracy to commit federal programs bribery; federal programs bribery; wire fraud and honest services wire fraud, aiding and abetting; mail fraud and honest services mail fraud , aiding and abetting; money laundering, aiding and abetting and filing a false tax return. (c)
  12. On September 13, 2021, he agreed to plead guilty to conspiracy to commit federal programs bribery, filing false tax returns for failing to report many of the bribery payments and three counts of federal programs bribery. Represented by Tracy A. Miner, he must forfeit assets that include $276,000 in lieu of his Falmouth home and $3.4 million, a sum equal to the amount he derived from his crimes. (a)
  13. He was 54 years old when he agreed to plead guilty to five charges on September 13, 2021. On September 15, 2021, the plea agreement was filed in U.S. District Court in Massachusetts and under the deal, seven counts were dismissed. (a)

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(This is a developing story. More details will be added.)

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