biographical data

Carl Wayne Buntion biography: 13 things about Aryan Brotherhood of Texas member

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Carl Wayne Buntion was a white man from Texas, United States. Here are 13 more things about him:

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  1. He and his twin brother Kenneth Buntion were born in Harris County, Texas. When he and Kenneth were children, their father was violent toward them and their mother.
  2. He was a member of the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas, a career criminal and a sex offender. In 1961, he was convicted of theft, which was his first conviction.
  3. On April 10, 1971, two police officers fatally shot his twin brother Kenneth during a shootout.
  4. In April 1989, he was convicted of sexually assaulting a teenage girl and was sentenced to 15 years.  
  5. On May 15, 1990, the Texas Department of Criminal Justice paroled him for the ninth time. He was released due to prison overcrowding and was given a new set of clothes and $200 in cash. He was ordered to report to the Texas House on Beaumont Highway in Houston but he never reported as ordered.
  6. On June 13, 1990, his non-appearance was reported to parole officials in Huntsville, Walker County, Texas.
  7. He was 4 years younger than his friend John Earl Killingsworth, an ex-convict. On June 27, 1990, Houston Police Department officer James Bruce Irby, then 37, pulled over a Pontiac for a traffic stop at the intersection of Airline Drive and Lyerly Street in Houston. He was sitting in the front passenger seat and Killingsworth was driving the car. He got out of the car and fatally shot Irby, who was talking to Killingsworth.
  8. In January 1991, a jury found him guilty of capital murder and sentenced him to death.
  9. In 2009, the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals vacated his death sentence.
  10. In 2012, a jury sentenced him to death again.
  11. His lawyers appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court, which denied his appeal in October 2021.
  12. On April 21, 2022, he was executed by lethal injection at the state penitentiary in Huntsville. He was pronounced dead at 6:39 p.m.
  13. He died at the age of 78, making him the the oldest inmate to be executed in Texas.
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